Commander in Chief B

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                  Commander in Chief B

Commander in Chief    Commander in Chief B
Confederate First Lady    Confederate First Lady B    Our Greatest Hero
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"Nothing fills me with deeper sadness than to see a Southern man apologizing for the defense we made of our inheritance.  Our cause was so just, so sacred, that had I known all that has come to pass, had I known what was to be inflicted upon me, all that my country was to suffer, all that our posterity was to endure, I would do it all over again.'' --- President Jefferson Davis
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                                                   Time Line for Jefferson Davis
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1807/1808 June 3 Born in Christian County (now Todd) on a site that has since become a part of Fairview, Kentucky, the son of Samuel Emory and Jane Cook Davis (for more information about Davis' birth year, see Frequently Asked Questions)
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1816-18 Attends St. Thomas College near Springfield, Kentucky
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1818-23 Enters Jefferson College in Adams County
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1823-24 Member of the junior class at Transylvania University in Lexington, Kentucky
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1824
July 4 Davis' father Samuel Emory Davis dies
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1829-34 As second lieutenant, serves in what is now Missouri, Iowa, Illinois, Michigan, Wisconsin, and Arkansas
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1834-35 Serves in Arkansas and Oklahoma (Indian) Territories
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1835 February 19 Acquitted in court-martial on charge of bad conduct
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May 12 Resignation from Army officially forwarded to headquarters
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June 17 Marries Sarah Knox Taylor (daughter of Zachary Taylor) near Louisville, Kentucky; leaves with bride for Mississippi
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September 15 Sarah Knox Taylor Davis dies at Locust Grove plantation near Bayou Sara, Louisiana; Davis seriously ill
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1836-46 Establishes Brierfield plantation on land adjacent to brother Joseph's Hurricane plantation on Davis Bend, 20 miles down the Mississippi River from Vicksburg; travels; becomes involved in local and state politics 1844
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January Chosen state Democratic presidential elector
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December 4 Casts electoral vote for James K. Polk
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1845 February 26 Marries 18-year-old Varina Banks Howell at The Briars, the home of her parents in Natchez, Mississippi
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October 3 Davis' mother Jane Cook Davis dies
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November 4 Elected to the House of Representatives
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1846 May 11 Votes in favor of bill declaring that a state of war exists between the United States and Mexico
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July 18 Assumes command of the 1st Mississippi in New Orleans
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September 21-23 Commands regiment in Battle of Monterrey 1847
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June 20 Declines appointment as brigadier general
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August 10 Appointed United States senator 1848
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January 11 Elected U.S. senator by Mississippi legislature 1850
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July 9 Present at death of Zachary Taylor 1851
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September 17 Accepts nomination as gubernatorial candidate
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September 23 Resigns as senator
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November 3-4 Defeated by Henry S. Foote in election
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1852 July 30 Son Samuel Emory Davis born
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1853 March 7 Takes oath of office as secretary of war
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June 1-15 1854
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June 13 Son Samuel Emory Davis dies 1855
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February 25 Daughter Margaret Howell Davis born 1857
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January 16 Son Jefferson Davis, Jr., born
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March 4 Resigns as secretary of war; takes oath as senator 1859
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April 18
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Son Joseph Evan Davis born in Washington while Davis is in Mississippi 1860
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November 6 Abraham Lincoln elected
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December 20 South Carolina secedes
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1861
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February 9 Elected president of the Confederate States
February 18 Inaugurated as president of the Confederacy; sworn in on front portico of the Alabama capitol
March 11 Congress ratifies Confederate Constitution
April 12 P. G. T. Beauregard fires on Fort Sumter, in Charleston, South Carolina
July 21 Battle of First Manassas (Bull Run), Virginia; Davis takes train to Manassas, arriving after the battle; tours grounds, addresses troops, and telegraphs news to Richmond; Joseph E. Davis and family arrive in Richmond for visit
August 10 Battle of Wilson's Creek, Missouri
October 21 Battle of Ball's Bluff (Leesburg), Virginia
December 6 Son William Howell Davis born
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1862
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January 19 Battle of Mill Springs, Kentucky
January 21 Attends funeral of John Tyler
February 6 Fort Henry, Tennessee, surrenders
February 16 Fort Donnellson, Tennessee, surrenders
March 7-8 Battle of Pea Ridge (Elkhorn Tavern), Arkansas
March 9 USS Monitor and CSS Virginia (Merrimack) fight to a draw off of Hampton Roads, Virginia
April 6-7 Battle of Shiloh, Tennessee
April 8 Island No. 10 off of New Madrid, Missouri, surrenders
September 17 Battle of Antietam (Sharpsburg), Maryland
September 22 Preliminary Emancipation Proclamation announced
October 3-4 Battle of Corinth, Mississippi
October 8 Battle of Perryville, Kentucky
December 7 Battle of Prairie Grove, Arkansas
December 13 Battle of Fredericksburg, Virginia
December 31-January 2 Battle of Stones River, Tennessee
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1863
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January 1 Emancipation Proclamation goes into effect; Galveston, Texas, retaken by Confederates
May 1-4 Battle of Chancellorsville, Virginia
May 16 Battle of Champion Hill, Mississippi; Pemberton retreats into Vicksburg and is invested by the 18th
July 1-3 Battle of Gettysburg, Pennsylvania
July 4 Siege of Vicksburg, Mississippi, ends in surrender
July 9 Siege of Port Hudson, Louisiana, ends in surrender
September 19-20 Battle of Chickamauga, Georgia
November 19 Lincoln delivers Gettysburg Address
November 21-24 Battle of Chattanooga, Tennessee
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1864
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February 20 Battle of Olustee, Florida
April 8 Battle of Mansfield, Louisiana
April 30 Son Joseph Evan Davis killed by fall from White House balcony
May 5-6 Battle of the Wilderness
May 7 William T. Sherman begins march toward Atlanta, Georgia
May 8-21 Battle of Spotsylvania Court House, Virginia
May 23-26 Battle of North Anna, Virginia
June 1-3 Battle of Cold Harbor, Virginia
June 18 Siege of Petersburg, Virginia, begins
June 19 USS Kearsarge sinks CSS Alabama off of Cherbourg, France
June 27 Daughter Varina Anne Davis (Winnie) born
July 17 Replaces Joseph E. Johnston with John Bell Hood in command of the Army of Tennessee outside of Atlanta, Georgia
July 22 Battle of Atlanta, Georgia
August 5 Battle of Mobile Bay, Alabama
September 1 Atlanta evacuated
November 15 Sherman leaves Atlanta on his march to the sea
November 30 Battle of Franklin, Tennessee
December 15-16 Battle of Nashville, Tennessee
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1865
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February 5 Meets with commissioners returning from Hampton Roads conference
February 13-16 Consults with Robert E. Lee in Richmond, Virginia
February [26] Confers with Lee, James Longstreet, and John C. Breckinridge about proposed cease-fire
March 19-21 Battle of Bentonville, North Carolina
April 1 Battle of Five Forks, Virginia
April 2 Receives word before and during church service that Lee cannot hold Petersburg and Richmond; leaves around 11 p.m. on train with
many government officials bound for Danville, Virginia
April 10 News reaches Danville of Lee's surrender (April 9); departs during evening for Greensboro, North Carolina
April 14 Lincoln shot by John Wilkes Booth at Ford's Theatre
May 10 Captured in early morning near Irwinville, Georgia
May 13 Caravan of Federal troops escorting prisoner Davis and his family reaches Macon
May 22 Imprisoned at Fortress Monroe
May 23 Manacled; irons removed less than a week later because of public outcry and Davis' ill health
June First indictment for treason handed down in U.S. Circuit Court, District of Virginia]; another indictment brought later in the year in the
District of Columbia
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1866
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May 8 indicted for treason by grand jury for the U.S. Circuit Court, District of Virginia (for more information about the case, see Frequently Asked Questions)
June
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June 11 U.S. Circuit Court Judge John C. Underwood refuses to set bail since Davis technically a military prisoner
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1867
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May 11 Taken to Richmond; housed under guard at the Spotswood Hotel in the same room he had when he reached Richmond in May 1861
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May
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May 13 Appears in court before Judge John C. Underwood; bail set at $100,000; bond posted by Horace Greeley, abolitionist Gerrit Smith, a representative of Cornelius Vanderbilt, and ten Richmond businessmen; to "deafening applause," freed after two years of confinement; meets Greeley for the first time (for more information about the case, see Frequently Asked Questions)”
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November 26 The United States v. Jefferson Davis convenes in Richmond; with Chase unable to be present, government granted postponement to March; Davis released on his own recognizance (his last appearance in court on this matter); long talk with Lee at the courthouse (last time he would see Lee); new grand jury drawn (Lee would testify before it the next day); (for more information, see Frequently Asked Questions); in the evening, receives news of the death of Margaret K. Howell, Varina's mother (Nov. 24)
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November-December
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1868 March-July
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Spends most of his time in Lennoxville, where Jeff Jr. and Billy are attending Bishop's College Grammar School, and Montreal, where Margaret is enrolled in a convent school Late April
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July 25 With family, sails from Quebec for Europe
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1869
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February 15 Indictment dismissed ( nolle prosequi), as are those against thirty-seven other Confederates (for more information, see Frequently Asked Questions)
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November 23 Elected president of Carolina Life Insurance Company at a salary of $12,000 a year; plans to move the home office to Baltimore
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1870
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October
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October 8 Sails with family for Baltimore; learns of Robert E. Lee's death (Oct. 12) upon arrival; family remains at Baltimore while Davis travels to Richmond
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1872 Son William Howell Davis dies of diphtheria at age 10
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1875 Declines appointment as senator from Mississippi and presidency of what is now Texas A&M University; begins relationship with Mississippi Valley Association (a British firm seeking to promote emigration to the South and to encourage direct trade between New Orleans and European ports), and starts promoting it in his travels; speaks in Texas, Arkansas, and Missouri; makes numerous visits to Vicksburg because of lawsuit; reaches informal agreement with W. T. Walthall to begin marketing proposal for Davis' memoirs; withdraws Jeff Jr. from Virginia Military Institute, and in fall travels with him to inspect mines in Colorado
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1876 January 1 Daughter Margaret marries Joel Addison Hayes at St. Lazarus Episcopal Church in Memphis (she will be the only Davis offspring to marry and to have children)late
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1878 October 16 Son Jefferson Davis, Jr., dies in Memphis in yellow fever epidemic at age 21
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1879 July 4 At bedside when Sarah Dorsey dies in New Orleans; Dorsey leaves Beauvoir to him in her will.
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1889

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The death of the President occurred at New Orleans about one o'clock a.m., December 6, 1889, and the event was announced throughout the Union.  The funeral ceremonies in New Orleans were such as comported with the illustrious character of the deceased chieftain, while public meetings in other cities and towns of the South were held to express the common sorrow, and the flags of State capitols were dropped to half-mast.  Distinguished men pronounced eulogies on his character, and the press universally at the South and generally at the North contained extended and laudatory articles on his character. 
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The burial place in New Orleans was selected only as a temporary receptacle, while a general movement was inaugurated for a tomb and monument, which resulted in the removal of the body to Richmond, the capitol of the Confederacy.  The removal took place by means of a special funeral train from New Orleans to Richmond, passing through several States and stopping at many places to receive the respectful and affectionate tributes bestowed by the people.  The scene from the time of the departure from New Orleans to the last rites at Richmond was singular in its nature and sublime in its significance of popular esteem for the memory of the Confederate President.  The funeral train moved day and night almost literally in review before the line of people assembled to see it pass.  Finally in the presence of many thousands the casket was deposited in the last resting place in the keeping of the city, which had so long withstood the rude alarms of war under his presidency.
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