Edmund Ruffin’s Revenge

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       Edmund Ruffin's Revenge .

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On June 18, 1865 Edmund Ruffin, a pre-eminent Confederate nationalist and "fire-eater" who had been one of the leading antebellum proponents of Southern secession, chose to commit suicide rather than submit to the subjugation of Yankee bayonet rule.  Defiant to the bitter end, this fiery Confederate patriot penned these famous last words in his diary just minutes before taking leave of the Yankee tyranny that had descended upon Dixie.  According to the Holy Scripture, I understand suicide to be a sin, yet I do appreciate his Confederate Patriotism, and sympathized with his sentiments, particularly those regarding Yankee rule!
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"I here declare my unmitigated hatred to Yankee rule -- to all political, social and business connection with the Yankees and to the Yankee race.  Would that I could impress these sentiments, in their full force, on every living Southerner and bequeath them to every one yet to be born!  May such sentiments be held universally in the outraged and downtrodden South, though in silence and stillness, until the now far-distant day shall arrive for just retribution for Yankee usurpation, oppression and atrocious outrages, and for deliverance and vengeance for the now ruined subjugated and enslaved Southern States!
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...And now with my latest writing and utterance, and with what will be near my latest breath, I here repeat and would willingly proclaim my unmitigated hatred to Yankee rule--to all political, social and business connections with Yankees, and the perfidious, malignant and vile Yankee race." --- Edmund Ruffin
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Victory is ours when we truly believe in a cause greater then ourselves!
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Monday, 21 July 2012
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It all started out as just another beautiful sun shinny day across most of the Southern States, and the sky couldn't have been more beautiful then it was over Virginia.  So blue it almost appeared as if one could look up and see heaven itself!  While this was not a recognized holiday still there seemed to be a holiday mood throughout the width and breadth of the land?  Reports were coming in that even across the prairies of Montana and Wyoming, they were experiencing exceptional weather for this time of year.  No doubt there would be a lot of sick outs today, for the very reason of the gorgeous weather, and who would dare lay blame.

A reenactment was scheduled to begin at 1:00 P.M. Eastern Time to commemorate the First Battle of Manassas.  This was a battle, which took place 153 years ago, and proved a complete victory for the Confederacy.  Newspapers across the land had reported our forces had driven the Union Army northward and out of Virginia.  There had been an ongoing sideline story being covered over television and the printed news media of a large solar flare, an eruption taking place on the surface of the sun, but who wanted to pay any notice to that kind of 'stuff' on such a beautiful day as today.

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The crowds were heavy at the Manassas Battle Field reenactment celebration, and by 10:00 A.M. the numerous Sutleries representing both the blue and the gray were doing a brisk business, as was also the snack bars.  New T-shirts, ball caps and the like could be seen everywhere, it was obvious this was going to be a great day for everyone who attended the festivities.  The park rangers and the managers of the festivities could be seen conversing with each other as everything was being prepared for the largest reenactment of the First Battle of Manassas, in more then a quarter century.
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The hour of the battlefield reenactment had finally come and those having planned the celebrations had taken care to ensure it would be as close as possible to the way it happened generations ago on these very fields of Manassas.  Only this time it was to be broadcast over television, for the sake of its educational value.  The various news agencies were expected to cover the reenactment, particularly given the size of the crowds, whose numbers were obviously equally on both sides, based upon their cheering.  Suddenly musket fire was seen and heard all along the skirmish lines, followed by the enormous noise of cannon going off by the score.
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However the opening volleys had no sooner began when a gigantic flash of light and a resounding explosion was heard from the north northeast and coming from the direction of Washington DC.  The earth shock and seemed to quiver like a pond of water after some one had tosses a stone into it, everyone was thrown to the ground and just as suddenly as it began it was over, save for the pillars of mixed black and white smoke rising skyward from the same general direction, as had the flashes of light and the explosion.  People began to pick themselves up from the ground, while look about in bewilderment, chattering to one another.

One elderly black lady was heard conversing with a nearby friend, she being from Washington, and asking; 'Do you think it was an airline accident or maybe some kind of gasoline storage explosion?'  Another white gentleman with a distinctive Boston accent replied, 'I don't think so madam, the fire ball we saw a while ago and the explosion was too large for either an aircraft or gasoline. 
Anyhow Washington is only an hour and a quarter away, even in heavy traffic!  I hope I am wrong lady, but this looks like big trouble, real big trouble!'  Anyone have a cell phone, asked a Confederate Re-enactor who had just approached the group from the field?

'I do replied a gentleman standing nearby; my brother lives in Richmond, perhaps he can tell us what's happening.'  After attempting to dial his brother he found his cell phone was dead; 'I don't understand, the batteries were fully charged over night and this phone has never given me trouble.'  Just then another a lady not far away could be heard grinding away at her automobile, in an attempt to get it started.  The old Confederate Re-enactor then said; 'it isn't your cell phone or that ladies automobile that is the problem.  Whatever caused that explosion, has neutralized all electrical power; it’s called a magnetic pulsation explosion!'  Just about that time one of those mini gliders with a small attached motor sailed down and landed in the open field not far from a company of Confederate Soldiers.
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The pilot climbed out and spoke to the Colonel who was still mounted on his stallion!  Soon the Colonel approached the crowd and began to speak; 'this pilot has given us a report from the scene that all traffic between here and Washington is stalled and several airline crashed have been spotted between here and Washington.  While the glider pilot only made it as far as the Potomac, his report states 'There is no longer a city called Washington DC.  A Park Ranger who had been standing in the crowd spoke up; 'since we are in a federal park and I am the senior ranger here, I am the authority and as such will decide what is to be done.  Unless you can reach Washington and resurrect the dead you have no one to report to, short of the Almighty God Himself.
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Reenactors Take the Lead

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Everyone's attention was soon drawn to the sight of two men on horseback riding toward us; it was the men who had been playing the roll of Generals Joseph E. Johnston and P.G.T. Beauregard, to their left was the man who played Yankee General Ervin McDowell.  The three men paused as General Johnston addressed the crowd.  While it is true we are merely re-enactors, however in view of the likelihood of a complete electrical blackout, including automobiles, telephones, televisions, etc. it is obvious these park rangers are unable to exercise any meaningful authority.  It is highly improbable we will see any police presence either, other then those few seen scattered about the park at entry and exodus points, serving as crowd control.
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A number of the Re-enactor Officers were gathered together to one side discussing what to do next, when three men from the crowd approached.  The one in the center later known simply as Bo Landers, pretty much spoke for the three of them; ‘Gentlemen, it is obvious, since both these blue bellies as well as you Confederates have the only transportation, the duty lies with us alone.  You must establish some semblance of authority, least the situation become chaotic.’  The man playing the part of Beauregard looks at the three men, ‘but we are not actual military officers, but merely play the part for the sake of reenacting.’
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Bo smiled, then answered, ‘we are certainly aware of that, however, it does require a measure of self-discipline and leadership to do what you do.  Besides if you men don’t step forward, who will?’  The Re-enactor Generals looked at each other then at the three men standing before them, then the man playing the part of Joseph E. Johnston, spoke for all of them.  ‘It is certainly obvious that unless power is restored shortly and all of our automobiles suddenly begin to work, we will all spend the night in the park.  It is true, since we do not as yet know the situation beyond this park, we therefore must, for survival purposes, maintained some form of civil order and decorum, so it is urgent that we begin to make preparations for what may lye ahead.

I am asking everyone to cooperate, including you park rangers!  Let us begin by asking everyone to be honest with yourself, and determine, if you are of Yankee persuasion or if perhaps you side with us Confederates.  General Erwin E. McDowell will ride across to the far end of the field and stand in position; each re-enactor or member of the crowd who is of Yankee persuasion, will then cross the field and take a position directly behind him.  Those who are Confederates will remain in place; afterward we will begin to make preparations for an enlarged encampment.  Special privacy considerations will be given to the ladies, within the limitations of our resources!’

The Officers and staff of the two groups of re-enactors began to function like unto the vary armies they were portraying, not out of any desire on their part but of necessity.  The large assortment of camping gear brought with them was now put to a totally different use, then had ever been anticipated; water containers, food and baby supplies were rounded up from any and all sources, some even brought in from nearby stores on horseback.  Additionally a scouting party was sent out in several directions, with orders to find the perimeters of the electrical blackout, and if possible find the extent of the damage.
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It was the morning of the 22 July when the last of the scouting parties finally returned.  The news they bore was both good and bad; meaning the blackout and damage was minimal in the south, but devastating in the north and far west.  It became obvious that two disasters had struck simultaneously.  The large solar flare carried with it the same effect, on a broad scale, as would an actual Magnetic Pulsation Bomb!  The second catastrophe was a meteorite, which made a direct hit on Washington, a meteorite consisting of just the right size and consistency that would cause an explosion of such a size, as to destroy a City of Washington.

Much destruction was found also in Alexandria Virginia but to a lesser degree.  The local Sheriffs discovered that across the Southland the expected convoys of army troops were not coming, so they began to swear in sufficient numbers of upstanding citizens as posies who would enforce good order.  This tended to prevent rioting, looting and burning and allowed for the round up of untold numbers of undesirables.  Where horses were available they were but to use, but in other cases bicycles were the police mode of transportation.  But eventually good Southern ingenuity as well as their management of available food supplies managed to somehow keep society together!
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The South Plans for Survival

Once the full extent of the tragedy was realized, it was made clear there was no inter-city or inter-state mechanized transportation, General Johnston or more correctly the man who had portrayed him, mustered his sizeable cavalry together.  The re-enactor playing the part of General P.G.T. Beauregard was charged with setting up a system of couriers to relay messages first between the major cities in Virginia, then eventually to other States.  In Richmond the governor extended full support for rounding up every available horse from such places as rodeos, and any other place where horses and riders were to be found.
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Old style typewriters and printing equipment, which operated manually, were also located, rounded up, and an emergency survival booklet was prepared.  Copies of these booklets were distributed to the various cities throughout Virginia, as well as the Statehouses of the 13 member States of the Confederacy, and onward to the mid-western states such a Montana and Wyoming.  Among the issues discussed in the booklet were the manual production of crops for food as well as how to purify water from rivers, creeks and ponds.  It only took a couple months for the couriers to be running between something like 27 state capitals, which then repeated the process within their own cities.

Another critical topic covered in these little booklets were such things as creating a home made hand pump, something our forefathers would have known, but the common knowledge having since been lost due to modern technology.  The various State Highway Patrols and Metropolitan Police from the various states spread themselves out into regional sub-headquarters in order to patrol a wider area using bicycles or available horses.  Those highways now totally clogged by abandoned vehicles, proved to be excellent expressways for courier riders and the regional police, who took up the project of providing relief riders, offering fresh mounts.

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The grassy areas along the highways, plus the eventual delivery of hay by local farmers gradually began to fill the final glitches in the makeshift system, making the process at the very least, tolerable.  Repairing formerly discarded bicycles provided full time work for such a large number of people, which often times included small pull carts for carrying food and other products.  Those states now cooperating with the process slowly organized themselves beginning with the most critical area of human activity, in order to sustain civilization, until the emergency was over.
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Throughout these same States, gardens began to appear around homes, businesses and even in many parks, and these small carts towed by bicycle riders carried the produce away.  Some innovations came about when people peddling homemade buggies began to appear, which brought a pleasant smile to many faces, as odd as they looked.  While survival was hard during this period of time, morale was much higher, as people gradually began to feel like we’d all survive these difficult times.  But while the South and Mid-west was busy carrying out their strategy, few could have realized the devastation, which covered the northeastern, and 'Far West States.'

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The Devastated Landscape

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Once the power was restored and Southern Leaders began to look beyond their own jurisdictions they discovered the extent of the devastation.  The federals could not send massive armies to enforce their laws, regulations and adjudications, because they now lacked the means, given the fact that there was no transportation and no government bureaucracy from which to draw support.  The monetary system had collapsed, collapsed monetary, and the Internal Revenue Service was for all practical purposes, none existent.  However this was by and large the effect felt throughout the South, meanwhile in the north and west the destruction and devastation was horrendous!
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The meteorite, which fell on Washington, was of the type which came in low and exploded over the city, which also struck cities primarily in the north, but also far western, such as San Francisco and Los Angeles.  These liberal bastions, lacking self discipline and morals, burned, looted and destroyed just about everything useful, during the food riots, which followed.  The Southern States having been freed from federal occupation during the emergency used the opportunity to cleanse its population of gangs, drug dealers as well as the perverted fostered by the Yankee Empire.
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While the civil population was busy organizing and reestablishing order, given that the larger portion of the U.S. Military was stationed in the Southern States.  Lacking the ability to transport their children by school bus, local churches opened their doors for classes, and even provided a large number of teachers.  This process was developed not only out of necessity, but was a kind of return to the time when churches commonly held a duel purpose, as both house of worship and school house.  Since churches are more common throughout the Southland, the process fell into place with relative ease.

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It began to appear as though the Southern States had gained ground by the devastation, while the Yankee and liberal States suffered near complete annihilation, and a collapsed of their society.  Cities like New York, Boston, Chicago, San Francisco, Los Angeles and San Diego, which either had outlawed or highly restricted gun ownership found many areas unable to muster an effective posse or a militia to reinforce their over taxed police forces.  Where in the South gun ownership is not uncommon, posses were formed in nearly every city standing alongside large militias, which were well armed.

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These possess and militias had used their emergency powers so as to confiscate arms and ammunition from abandoned or sparsely manned armories, gun shops and in some cases the military itself.  The comparison was apparent; there existed an orderly south, beside a devastated north and far west, the larger portion of the Union Military remained stranded around the world, fighting foreign wars as well as United Nations police actions.  The death and destruction throughout the north and far west was awesome, most of which was self-imposed!

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Thursday, 1 January 2015
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While the delivery of personal mail had not been completely resumed in every case, official State Government emergency traffic was flowing on a reliable and steady basis.  The pony express system as it had been termed allowed the Deep South States to compare notes, and a special meeting was called for 22 February that same year in Montgomery.  Amazingly all thirteen member States of the Confederacy plus Arizona, New Mexico and Oklahoma, as in attendance.  It was at this meeting, the news came that the negative impact of the enormous sun flare was slowly beginning to ease, which spawned a plan to organize whatever remained of the former U.S. Military in the South, as well as State National Guard into Confederate States Armed Forces.
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The movement of traffic was very gradual in coming but it was sufficient within a month to quicken the formation of the Confederate States Armed Forces which was for the most part completed by 14 May when communications by telephone became possible on a limited basis but were for the most part put back online.  Work Crews began to organize and moving along the freeways and highways removing stranded or stalled vehicles from the road.  The process had advanced sufficiently that by Monday 12 July the newly elected Confederate States Government was sworn into office in Montgomery Alabama, which included the Second President of the Confederacy, George Randolph Cal Curry.

Montgomery had been chosen since it was considered more centrally located and it was after all the birthplace of the nation.  However plans were formulated for a grand reentry into Richmond, which would take place after the emergency, was officially over!  On Tuesday 4 August the President gave a speech to a joint session of the congress in which he declared; 'The Southern and Mid-western States have not only survived this terrible emergency which had been trust upon us and have now restored the Confederate States Government.

However it is prudent and necessary that we send armed troops into the north in order to discover the full extent of the damage in that region.  We are compelled by common human decency to see for ourselves their suffering, now that we ourselves have come through in good order.  However it should be obvious to everyone concerned that irregardless of the situation in the north and far west, things will never return to their former condition nor should they in any case.
 Tuesday, 1 September 2015


On Wednesday 1 September large convoys of the Confederate Army, Marines with Confederate Air Corps cover, as well as Navy sea patrols, crossed the 'Mason Dixon Line' from the South, while the ships of the ‘Confederate Combined Fleet’ sailed into the Yankee water at Boston and New York.  At the same time smaller river gunboats of the Confederate Border Patrol moved across the line from the Mississippi and up the Ohio River.  It was known from the beginning that Washington DC had been totally annihilated; none-the-less a regimental size Confederate scouting party crossed the Potomac River.

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The mission was partly humanitarian, while at the same time ensuring 'those people' will never again constitute a threat to the Confederacy and its people.  In essence a Republic of Sovereign States will be permitted in the Northeast, but the now fallen Yankee Empire itself must never rise again.  The morning of the crossing seemed to go without incident!  There was a full division of Tennesseeans’ positioned at Louisville Kentucky prepared to cross the Ohio River into Illinois, as well as a Kentucky Division also at Louisville prepared to head directly for the heartland of Indiana.

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While at the same time ‘Lieutenant General Gordon Forrest ‘no relationship to Nathan Bedford Forrest’, mustered two more divisions at Covington Kentucky, which was prepared to move northward toward Dayton, Columbus and Cleveland Ohio.  The three armies were prepared should there be some a measure of resistance, but by the time they had moved through Dayton headed for Columbus, the State Capital, all they found were surprising stares from the locals.  The citizens of these states had obviously been so cut off from the outside world, due to the power outage during the emergency; they had no knowledge of the Confederacy's rebirth.
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As with so many other areas, these small northern villages and towns seemed to have survived with only minor signs of what had taken place, accept for the drawn look in their faces of the citizens, having suffered none-the-less.  The Confederate troops were by this stage recognizable as Confederates, howbeit they were in the early stages and a complete uniform development had not occurred.  However there was no mistaken by local citizens, as to the identity of these troops; they were now under occupation by the Confederate States of America, and the tables of history had been reversed.

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Still, by the time Dayton had been reached, the atmosphere began to change and there were signs of massive damage caused by rioting and looting.  The same situation existed in Columbus to an even greater degree!  The same situation existed in the neighboring States of Indiana and Illinois, by the time the three Confederate Armies reach the far northern sector, the Great Lakes region, only medium to small villages and towns remain, those of larger size had either been destroyed by meteorites or roving gangs.  Even after the electric power was again possible, the large city electric companies were no longer able to provide service.

Where service could be provided news and information from television and radio, previously controlled by conglomerates in Chicago and New York no longer existed, given the total destruction of these metropolitan areas.  The results were a complete reorganization of the mass media centered in Atlanta, under corporate names such as the 'Confederate News Network and Dixie Broadcasting.'  Many small to medium size villages and towns began setting up satellite companies in order to provide television and radio service from Atlanta.

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Tuesday, 19 April 2016

On one bright Tuesday in April Confederate Major General Barnard Gordon crossed into California with two full divisions of troops, two regiments were ordered to scout the small towns and villages of the middle to eastern sector of the State.  Another two regiments were sent, one north and the other south respectively, with orders to report back on a regular basis.  The remainder of this force was ordered north and south along the coast in the general direction of San Diego, Los Angeles and San Francisco.  General Gordon and his convoy had entered California over route 80 heading directly west across the mountains, whereupon they entered the modest size community of Auburn, where the general set up his state headquarters.
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Scouts were sent southward of the town to investigate the Ridgecrest area where the China Lake Naval Weapons Center as well as Fort Irwin Training Center had been located.  It was found that most of the interstate highway systems had been destroyed; either by the meteorites or by the tsunamis which followed, yet somehow state highways 49 and 89 had survived, therefore these were used as the main north south corridor.  It was on a Saturday May when President Calvin McKay received preliminary reports from California!
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Mr. President, the general wrote; "After covering a large portion of the state, both by land and via the several 45 foot water craft of the Border Patrol, it can be accurately stated the State of California, as we have known it to be, has been totally destroyed.  The loss life and property is to enormous, it is my estimation the area of destruction would certainly include everyone and everything living along the lowlands of the coastline, and inland for at least 75 miles.
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There are no remnants remaining of what was the previous State authority, however nearly all of the cities and towns along the foothills of the mountains and westward have survived.  Only a small percentage remains of the once strong U.S. and State military presence; even these have been rendered totally impotent as an effective force.  However small survival booklets thus far distributed by the Confederacy, have managed to reach the survivors, having since held a convention in Auburn for the purpose of formally abolishing the previous California State Constitution.
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The surviving citizens have thus far drafted and ratified a new constitution and are now building a more conservative California.  It would appear that liberalism in the state has perished during the devastation.  We have thus far met with minimal resistance, and for the most part we were welcomed into California as the only remaining representatives of an orderly society.  A regiment under Colonel Bo Jamison was attacked by what appeared to be a sizeable band of looters and gang members who were well armed and had somehow managed to avoid the destruction, which fell upon San Bernardino.

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After refusing to lay down their arms and continuing to show strong resistance, it became necessary to return fire; none of them survived.   We did manage to locate a mixed company of U.S. Army, Navy and State National Guard troops, which had survived the destruction of Sacramento and were moving on foot eastward on highway 50 toward Pollack Pines.  They were armed but seemed happy to surrender their weapons in exchange for a decent meal and the possibility of a nights sleep.  It is my estimation Mr. President, the humanitarian assistance will be minimal to none and the destroyed cities along the coast are irretrievable, resembling a desolate moon scrape more then the ruins of major cities." ... Barnard Gordon, Major General, Commanding!
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Friday, 3 June 2016
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The birthday of our first Confederate President who was now considered the father of the restoration had finally arrived, but this time it was under the circumstances of an independent Confederacy.  The citizenry had begun to lighten up considerably now that the emergency was all but over; at least in the Confederate States.  Celebrations were scheduled throughout the nation with parades and all manner of games and excitement for both adults and children.  None-the-less expenditures on the celebrations were toned down to a large degree for the sake of the ongoing economic recovery; still the excitement was exuberant and fostered wide participation.
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President Calvin McKay had been encouraged to attend the Montgomery celebrations, believing it would be good for public morale if the people could see their president as a sign that things were stabilizing.  The news of all the devastation in the far west was about to be eclipsed by stories coming out of New York, Boston, Chicago and Washington DC.  The choppers went in first to survey the situation and found only devastation and ruin!

The famous landmarks such as the Capital Building, Supreme Court Building and the various monuments all lay in piles of pulverized dust, as if some giant hand had torn through the city, heaved the pieces around like toys.  Even then the larger portion of stones and masonry, which remained solid, could be broken and crushed with a man's hand.  The meteor had obviously come in at low altitude and exploded over the city, but amazingly the meteors seemed to concentrate their destruction within the city itself.

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The Arlington area on the Virginia side of the Potomac a mixed bag, with heavy destruction along the river and only scattered ruins just a few miles inland.  The estate of General Robert E. Lee, which had been stolen by Yankee invaders, and was now known as Arlington Cemetery, suffered the worst from the meteorites.  There was no sign of the once numerous tombstones anywhere, it was as if they simply vanished and later it would be discovered that even the caskets had somehow been removed and washed down river into the sea.
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The Lee Mansion was severely damaged but remained standing; its damage as it appeared, seemed to be repairable.  Under these conditions confederate troops managed to muster in the Manassas Virginia area, preparing to cross the river into what remained of Abraham Lincoln's Capital City.  One cannot help but wander if Lincoln could have foreseen these present results of his aggressive war against the Confederacy; would he have pursued the same course?

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Tuesday, 5 July 2016
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It was a bright Monday morning at dawn when the choppers landed in force in what had been Washington DC, only this time they carried a regiment of advance Confederate Special Tactics Forces.  Nearly five hours later, an entire convoy crossed over into Washington over bridges, which were severely damaged but deemed capable of carrying the weight of the long convoy.  The Confederates had come in Division strength and were well prepared for whatever contingency they might face, but when the reality finally became clear, it was realized there was nothing remaining of Imperial Washington on the Potomac.
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It was determined that even the subways and the bunker below the Capital as well as the Whitehouse had collapsed, killing those seeking shelter inside.  Based upon news reports prior to the arrival of the meteor. nearly the entire federal government and its bureaucracy were in town for a special conference.  It was Confederate General Hugh Taylor of Virginia who had summarized in a joint survey, which had been made by the various commanders.
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General Taylor had this to say; "In all the annals of war and natural disasters I cannot find the likes of what we found in the former Union Capital City.  If any remnants of what this city’s former self neither my officers nor I have been able to uncover it!   We have instead found ourselves walking through a ‘fine gray white dust’ up to our ankles, below this layer one can only imagine.  Occasionally we found piles of stones and masonry from which the public buildings had once been constructed.
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It is my assessment; the proper course of action would be to restore the former District of Columbia to its original governance, that being the State of Maryland.  The estate of General Robert E. Lee can no longer in a practical sense be considered a cemetery, all the graves and stones having been either pulverized or removed entirely by the disaster.  Therefore it is my considered opinion; the ‘Lee Estate’ should be enlarged to its original acreage, with the historic buildings and grounds restored to their pre-occupation condition.
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On the extreme outer fringes of the Washington DC area the destruction was sparse and the bodies of unnumbered deceased had been buried by the surviving locals." --- Robert E. Taylor, Brigadier General, Commanding.  President McKay was not required to consult the Confederate Congress on the issue of Washington, never the less he chose to seek some type of congressional concurrence on the situation.  As a result a month later the former District of Columbia was restored to the State of Maryland, by an over whelming vote of the Confederate States Congress.
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The issue regarding the ‘Estate of General Robert E. Lee’ was opened to public debate. We;; before any action was taken!  As a result it was decided, with the advice of the Confederate States Congress proper the proper procedures would be to return the estate to the State of Virginia, whereupon a private organization was formed to raise funds for its restoration to pre-occupation conditions.  The estate would be reopened as a functioning plantation and State Park, for the education and enjoyment of future generations.

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The Confederate President visited both the Lee Estate as well as the Washington Area, afterward making his own report to the Confederate States Congress.  Whereupon he stated in part, "The once Republic of Sovereign States had degenerated into a Consolidation of Socialist States, therefore let this former Union Capital be buried and forgotten with history."  The fall of the Yankee Empire so long predicted finally came to pass, but not by act of war nor a social upheaval, but rather by what has been considered the due reward for their deeds.
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‘Those people’ the Yankees, had taken up the sword unjustly against a sovereign people and nation, the Confederate States of America.  The empire therefore suffered a justice that only the Almighty God could have rendered, he who created all things, including meteors and magnetic storms.  The grandeur and splendor of what had become the imperial capital of an empire would now be remembered only in dry, dusty and forgotten history books, left on the back shelf of a long neglected library.
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Summarization
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It is said that history is written by the victor and this is quite true; still, the history of the fallen Yankee Empire as well as the Confederate States of America will one day now be written by the vary people and nation, they sought to annihilate.  The vast number of Midwestern States would eventually join the Confederacy the others in the northeast would gradually bring about the rebirth of the Republic of Sovereign States, on a much smaller scale.
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While the re-born United States of America would never reach its former pentacles of world-class power, yet, in the long term of history, its citizens would be freer and better served in the process.  The Confederate States of America would grow to 37 continental States, Hawaii and Alaska would form a confederation under a modern format of the Polynesian Kingdom, having a king while at the same time being democratic in nature, with a Parliament and a Prime Minister.

The Hawaiian Islands would also be restored to a Polynesian culture, attracting an enormous business and tourist trade from around the world.  The Confederacy would itself become a world-class power, economically, militarily and diplomatically, while never assuming upon itself the roll of a world police force, nor would it become an agent for the enforcement of United Nations Resolutions.
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The United Nations representatives were eventually dismissed from both the Confederate States of America as well as the re-born United States.  Ultimately both nations settled down to the long and expensive task of rebuilding, after the greatest natural disaster ever to befall either nation. The big cities of New York, Boston, Chicago, San Francisco, Los Angeles and San Diego would pass into history, while being replaced by medium size town bearing totally different names, still others would completely disappear from the map forever.
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'Those people' as General Robert E. Lee liked to call them, imposed their will upon a sovereign people and nation by force, and were brought down by an even greater force.  History had drastically altered its course forever, the results would be permanent and long lasting, and would be felt worldwide.  Six years later, at the end of his term President Calvin McKay would be quoted in his last State of the Confederacy Address; "The age of the arrogant world powers have passed, let them be buried forever in the dark pages of history, they themselves helped to create."


God save the Confederacy
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“Would that I could have said to my soldiers, resist, and hang out our banners on the outer wall etc!   But the day of retribution has not yet come when we shall be able to satiate our spirit of revenge on those fanatics and radicals of the North. When ever it does, we shall make them drink of the poisoned chalice to the very dregs . . . maybe a counter-revolution would be necessary.” ... General P.G.T. Beauregard.
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