Legend of the Gray

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                     Legend of the Gray
                               Could it actually be true?
                                 July 1992
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There is every reason to believe the story of the Legion of the Gray as presented below is true, however in any case its purpose is to inspire those who believe in the Confederate Cause to look to the future with pride in our history, heritage, culture and yes our nationhood.  The Confederate Veterans of that terrible war have since marched off into history, their once long gray lines growing fewer with passing years until the last of them had finally reported to their Supreme Heavenly Commander.
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Surely many of them must have believed the books were closed on the Confederate States of America, forever.  However the modern generation of Confederates has now been called upon to reopen the scroll and write the next chapter.  Let us seek the always the complete will of Almighty God, that we might be found worthy of his grace and mercy upon our cause!.

"The contest is not over, the strife is not ended. It has only entered upon a new and enlarged arena." --- Jefferson Davis, address to the Mississippi legislature - 16 years after the wars end.
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War and Remembrance
The 1911 Confederate Veterans Reunion
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In May 1911, former Civil War soldiers gathered at Little Rock, Arkansas, for the 21st Annual Convention of the United Confederate Veterans.  Established in New Orleans, Louisiana, in 1889, the UCV sought to "unite in a general federation all associations of Confederate veterans." The organization sponsored its first reunion that summer, and ex-soldiers retold war stories and revived old friendships. Reunions of Confederate groups became a popular method for reminiscing about the "old days" and gave veterans the opportunity to enjoy the comradeship of other soldiers. As the twentieth century began, reunions also allowed veterans the chance to share memories with a younger generation.
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By 1910, the number of Confederate veterans still living had decreased dramatically. Organizers estimated only 11,000 of the more than one million men who fought for the Confederacy between 1861 and 1865 would be able to attend another reunion. Some members of the UCV worried this might be the last opportunity for aged friends, relatives, and soldiers to meet. Veterans were not the only people present, however, Widows attended on behalf of their husbands, and children of Confederate veterans came to represent their deceased fathers..

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As a result, the 1911 United Confederate Veterans reunion was the largest such celebration as long-lost friends and families reunited in Little Rock. Expecting no more than 50,000 reunion-goers, the city was overwhelmed when twice that number arrived. For three days, more than 106,000 visitors commemorated the fiftieth anniversary of the firing on Fort Sumter and the start of the Civil War.

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                                                Legend of the Gray.
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                                Approximate number of Veterans attending – 11,000
                               The 2010 Little Rock Census – approximately 700,000
                         The 1910 Little Rock Census – 45,941, Total Visitors – 106,000
                      Estimated number of Confederate Soldiers of 1861-65 – 1,000,000
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There is a legend I'd like to share with those that love the Confederate Cause, and all of you should find this very interesting!  The Legend of the Gray as described herein is told just as related to me, and given the individual involved as well the circumstances; I have no reason to doubt.  It all begins on 16, 17 and 18 May 1911, where there was a Confederate Veterans meeting in Little Rock, Arkansas.  The meetings turned out to be more like a public rally then just a meeting of Veterans, which belatedly marked the 50th year since the War for Confederate Independence.  It turned out to be the largest gathering of Confederate Veterans since the war, and the atmosphere was exceedingly jubilant to say the least.
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The then much smaller City of Little Rock overflowed with people, so much so that tent cities surrounded the town!  The streets were, unlike similar gatherings in our time, covered in Confederate Flags, and Southern pride filled the air!  When the festivities were over, the aged Confederate Veterans gathered at the train depot; trains were the primary means of cross-country transportation at the time.  As the old veterans exchanged their parting "goodbyes" the feeling was that given their diminishing numbers as well as their advanced age, this would be the last great gathering of the Confederates in Gray.  It was no doubt obvious to everyone that many of these veterans would not see another year!

However, about that time a very elderly Negro woman who was in attendance, overheard them talking, and their conversation caught her attention.  The Negro woman slowly turned toward them, walked over, faced the group of aged white veterans, and began to speak!  "You white folks got it all wrong" said the old woman!  The elderly lady had by this time gained their full and undivided attention, so one of them replied to her statement; "What do we have wrong," asked the old Confederate soldier.  The woman glanced at each of the old Soldiers, then looked directly into the eyes of the one, which had asked the question.
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"This ain't the last Great Gathering of the Gray" spoke the elderly Negro woman, all of the old Confederate Soldiers where now focused on this aged woman before them.  She glanced about at the soldiers then continued her speaking, "Far beyond your lifetime and mine, she said, there will be another Great Gathering of the Gray; so great that when it happens it will change history for all time.”  The woman paused once more then continued, "They will come from the four winds and this sir, will be the last Great Gathering of the Grey."  Finally the woman finished her prophesy, turned, excused herself with a nod and walked away, the old Confederate Soldiers shortly afterwards, made their own departures.
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The Confederate Soldiers would turn over in their minds what was told to them by the aged Negro woman, nonetheless in due course of time, the legend lay forgotten.  However in the summer of 1992 while serving as a driver, transporting disabled patients to medical appointments and hospitals, word came to me from a visiting Rodeo Cowboy from Arkansas.  He indicated to me that he was at that time, scouting for suitable stock for the National Rodeo Circuit, and had stopped by the local area, so as to gain medical treatment for his mother.  The Cowboys mother traveled with on occasion!
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All indications told me this Rodeo Cowboy is an honorable gentleman!  It was he who described to me of what he termed ‘a handful of present day elderly Negro women in Arkansas,’ that were ‘little girls’ in 1911, and who were present with their parents when the prophesies were spoken.  These now elder women themselves, but little girls at that time, had heard for themselves the words that the elderly Negro woman spoke to the Confederate Veterans.  The Arkansas Cowboy carefully explained to me, what was said to the Confederates on that day, and gave the circumstances surrounding the prophetic utterances!
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He then stated that this heretofore forgotten legend was being spoken of again!  That what these ladies were saying at that time in 1992 is, the time of fulfillment draws near and we are to prepare for the "Great Gathering of the Gray!"  Almighty God is not restricted in time, and He has remembered the prayers of our fallen warriors: delivered unto Him in blood, sweat and tears.  Those anguished prayers are now being combined with our own.  The victory for which they fought, suffered, bled and died will yet be granted!
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                  “When the time has fully come, God answers prayer in the wisdom of His own Divine Providence!”.

God Save the Confederacy
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"When time shall have softened passion and prejudice, when reason shall have stripped the mask from representation, then justice, holding evenly her scales, will require much of the past censure and praise to change places." --- President Jefferson Davis
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