Ranks and Insignias

Confederate Legion Alphabetical Menu Confederate National Flag Must Read Stories Confederate History Menu Dreams and Visions Feature Articles Humor Central Inspirational Stories Short Story Time The Chaplain's Corps Window in Time Angel in Gray Alein Ghost Soldiers Bibles and Guns Confederate Holidays Marriage and Divorce Modern Warefare My Boyhood Church Pride in my Flag Pilgrimage to Masada Proclamation of Independence Take Me Home The Confederate Cause The Ten Commandments Winds of Atlanta Women in Men's Apparel Contact Us

Ranks and Insignias

 

It is suggested that a comparison be made between the historical Confederate Ranks and Insignias as well as those of the present day, then relate these to the possibility of creating a Confederate Patriot Guard. Such a command would beyond a doubt become the showpiece of the Confederate Cause!
.

The below web pages are a critical part of the below story, you are invited to
log onboard each of them, in order to gain a complete understand of the topic.
{Hyperlink attached}

Confederate Patriot Guard
The Palace Guard

Prelude to Liberation
.

.
There were four (4) grades of general officer (general, lieutenant general, major general, and brigadier general), but all wore the same insignia regardless of grade. This was a decision made early in the conflict. The Confederate Congress initially made the rank of brigadier general the highest rank. As the war progressed, the other general-officer ranks were quickly added, but no insignia for them was created.

(Robert E. Lee was a notable exception to this. He chose to wear the rank insignia of a colonel.) Only eight men achieved the rank of (full) general; the highest ranking (earliest date of rank) was Samuel Cooper, Adjutant General and Inspector General of the CSA.
.

 

 

 

.
Officers' uniforms bore a braid design on the sleeves and kepi, the number of adjacent strips (and therefore the width of the lines of the design) denoting rank. The color of the piping and kepi denoted the military branch. The braid was sometimes left off by officers since it made them conspicuous targets. The kepi was rarely used, the common slouch hat being preferred for its practicality in the Southern climate.

God save the Confederacy
.

 .

“Free men will never consent to giving up the means of
defending their liberties” {Dr. Joseph Warren} – 1775
.