The Invisible Warriors

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            The Invisible Warriors
            The story of seven Confederate Soldiers, which refused to accept defeat or surrender!

History is not an absolute, but cause and effect: Change the cause and you alter the effect.  What if a single decision or battle had went the other way?   Perhaps an election had turned out differently!   We as individuals are capable of altering the future course of history by our activism, or lack thereof.  Imagine with us for a moment, certain historical events had indeed taken an alternate course.

Some might conclude that our history, heritage, culture and nationhood having been suppressed and culturally cleansed; it is only natural for events to swing completely in the opposite direction.  While others will maintain that a gradual process has been underway since the surrender of our Confederate Armies.


Regardless of one’s feelings it is apparent that under a liberated and independent Confederate States of America the heroes of our past would be respectfully honored.  In any case Confederate Fiction allows us to dream and envision victory; otherwise "where there is no vision, the people parish." {Proverbs 29:18}
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“Nor shall your glory be forgot while fame her record keeps, or honor points the hollowed spot where valor proudly sleeps.”
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History is often altered by the few who refuse to accept surrender or occupation as an option, this is particularly true regarding the story you are about to read, concerning the Confederate War for Independence, incorrectly termed the ‘Civil War.’  It was the evening of 8 April 1865 and it was known throughout the camp General Robert E. Lee would surrender the Army of Northern Virginia to General Ulysses S. Grant on the marrow.  The air was full of gloom; they all knew that with the surrender of Robert E. Lee, the remainder of the Confederate Armies would also surrender and the Yankees would occupy the Confederacy.  While the numbers in their army were steadily dwindling, still, every man remained devoted to the Confederate Cause and would follow their general to the last man if necessary, rather then surrender.
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While the hubbub of gossip spread throughout the encampment, a single soldier referred to as Private Bremerton, slipped away to a location outside the perimeter of the camp and stood alone amongst a stand of trees, for to give serious thought to the matter.  Shortly, another joined him, and another until there was seven, one among their numbers being none other then General George E. Pickett who once served throughout the war with General Robert E. Lee.  They each spoke in quiet tones, some where shocked at the idea of surrender, so they offered little more then a few utterances.  That is until Private Bremerton spoke up, “I can only speak for myself, but it is my opinion we joined this army voluntarily in defense of our homeland and for our rights. There is nothing in the rule book which convinces me to surrender; for me the war continues until victory or death.”
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The General listened to the others as they each spoke their piece; then he walked over and stood beside Private Bremerton; “those who stand with Private Bremerton, walk over here and stand with the two of us or else return to the encampment before you are missed.”  One by one the other five looked at each other, then slowly walked over and stood together.  Private Bremerton then stated; “since the General is obviously senior in rank to all of us, I propose that he should naturally be our commander!  They all voted with a nod of the head and the General assumed command of what would later become known as the Invisible Warriors.  The General then gave his first order; “We will not return to the camp, but depart immediately, meet in a secluded place and plan our strategy for continuing the war."
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The Invisible Warriors moved quietly heading west toward the highlands of the Shenandoah, an area to which the General had become familiar over the years.  Once their little squad was far enough away from Lee’s camp, as well as the Yankee Army they paused for a short respite as well as to discussed their immediate needs.  It was decided they would scavenge for food, weapons, ammunition and horses from the Yankees, while uniforms would be obtained from the disbanding Confederate Armies.  Eventually they’d need to purchase or trade for their basic necessities if they were to prove legitimate, which meant accumulating a stockpile of gold, preferably in an easily negotiable form, such as coins.  It was quickly decided the battle tactics, which were so popular during the war, were no longer applicable to the situation in which they found themselves.
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This small band soon became the last of the Confederate Warriors left standing in defense of liberty and independence, thus their strategy had to be of such a nature as to turn their status into an advantage rather then a ‘Lost Cause.’  They found an abandoned stone house in the Shenandoah Highlands not far from a cave, which had become overgrown and forgotten during the war years.  They decided to dismantle the house, stone by stone, in order to build a suitable quarters headquarters inside the cave.  The project took a month of hard work, but when finished the inside of the cave was much like entering a house, which might be found in any number of places.  There was space for horses, as well as cold food storage made possible by the year around coolness of the cave itself; just about everything a small band of warriors would need.  In meantime periodic raids were conducted against those Yankees deemed the greatest threat to their strategy!
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These men were dead and forgotten to those who had known them before and during the war, now they would ride as unknown and unidentifiable Confederate Raiders.  Eventually they would develop a unique uniform and a persona all there own, but in the meantime they made use of those Confederate Uniforms they managed to find along the way.  By the end of the first few months they found suitable arms, which included the latest repeating rifles, pistols and an abundance of amount of ammunition.   Their luck began to turn when they came across a stable of recently purchased Yankee Horses which by some stroke of happen chance, had not yet been branded and were all black in color.  This gave the General the idea of conducting their raids on the darkest of nights, and their night uniforms would be black in color, in order to match the darkness as well as the color of their horses.
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During their initial departure from General Lee’s encampment, while scavenging for food they uncovered a plot to assonate Abraham Lincoln and they managed to convince those involved not to go through with their plans for the sake of their own ongoing strategy, so the men involved simply joined the ongoing Confederate Underground agreeing to serve as spies.  Once developed, their uniforms were well-fitted black long sleeve shirt and trousers, the collar tailored like unto those worn by cadets.  The collar and trim were also black save for their hand sewn Confederate Battle Flag embroidered insignia devises.  The few who were privileged enough to see them close up described their uniform appearance as seeming to be of satin or silk with capes which flapped hard in the breeze as they rode like the wind through the darkest of nights.
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There first mission involved coming to the aid of farm and plantation families terrorized by rogue Union Troops, which roamed the countryside pillaging, robbing, raping and murdering innocent people.  Often as not taking from them even the last morsel of bread as well what little money and means they may have possessed, with which to produce sorely needed crops for the coming year.  A small family farm not far from Appomattox Courthouse was about to bear witness to the most unusual Calvary Riders since General J.E.B. Stuart rode circles around the Union Army.  It was a peaceful Friday evening in mid-May 1865, approximately an hour before sunset when a motley looking squad of Union Troops were spotted coming down the long entryway to the farm.
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The man and women of the house both being well past their middle years, worn down by the war and unarmed, felt helpless; they were well aware of the stories told as to how these Blue bellies treated other families and why they were coming.  They rushed about to hide their teenage granddaughter; for fear that these evil men would violate her.  There was a trap door behind the fireplace in the setting room which lead to an exit tunnel hidden by shrubs and bushes, located some distance away; they hoped against hope the trap door would not be discovered.  The Yankees pounded on the door, making it know they’d break it down if someone did not open it for them.  The Yankees had just breached the door when the thunder of hoof beats could be heard coming from the backside of the house.
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As the frighten family peeked out a front window from behind tattered curtains, they saw three men riding black stallions approach from the north side and four from the south side; they were masked, dressed in black and wore black capes with red liners which flapped in the wind as they rode.  The horsemen drew revolving pistols and killed all but one of the Yankees, before they even had the time to raise their riffles to a suitable firing position.  Turning to the lone Yankee who was by this time frozen in position, the General dismounted walked up the steps to the porch and turned to him.   Even from some distance away the woman of the house spotted the Confederate Battle Flag insignias and on what was obviously some type of uniform; there ours, she whispered to her husband.  Are you sure he asked; sure enough to know the Yankees wouldn’t be killing there own kind.

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The man and woman feeling safe once more exited the house and faced the General as well as the Yankee Soldier standing nearby; the General greeted both of them, as would a Southern Gentleman.  My apologies for the mess we have made so close to your front door, please excuse us if we do not introduce ourselves; our mission requires anonymity.  About that time the teenage granddaughter exited and stood beside her grandparents.  She was at that time properly introduced, the General then turned to the Yankee Sergeant and stated; we have spared your life, in order that you might relay our message to your commander.  My message is a matter of life and death, “Leave the Southland or die.  Should any further harm come to these fine people; a hundred Yankees will perish for each of them!”
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The Yankee Soldier having been disarmed, was dismissed, mounted his horse and could be seen riding off in the distance toward town, in full gallop; no doubt considering within himself that he alone has allowed to live and tell a most amazing story to his commander.  The General ordered his men to drag the dead Yankees Soldiers and hide them in the bushes on the north side of the house; a crew would be along shortly to remove them from the property and deposit them at the Yankees own doorstep.  He then reached down from his horse and handed the old man a hand full of gold coins; this should help a little until you can make the farm productive once more.  The old gentleman of the house then asked; “Who are you people?”   Friends and soldiers of the Confederate States of America!
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The seven of them mounted, waved at the family standing on the porch, which were by this time almost dazed at what they had witnessed; the family quietly waved back and watched as their rescuers rode off in the distance, their capes flapping in the breeze.  Later that very night, as the time approached midnight a loud ruckus was heard on the main street of the town, just outside the building being used as a Yankee Headquarters.  These same Black Robed Horsemen now being referred to even by the Yankees, as the Invisible Warriors, was seen riding full gallop through town, each having a Yankee branded horse in tow, each bearing one or more dead Yankee Soldiers.  They simply cut these ‘pack horses’ loose, then disappeared in the distance as quickly as they arrived; the Yankees having been caught by surprise, hardly had time to react to the situation.
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Their next series of targets were those Commanding Generals of the Union Armies, which in their view had committed atrocities; in each case these men was afterward reported to have met with an accident, otherwise no one could tell what had happened.  Among their targets were Generals William F. Butler, Philip H. Sheridan, William Tecumseh Sherman, George Armstrong Custer and many others who would in time follow their compatriots to the grave; many ‘Union War Generals’ began to walk in fear for their very lives.  The most aggressive and effective top military leaders of the Union Army were all to often meeting with accidents!  The only message ever left at the scene was handed to the press by an anonymous courier stating; “The Confederate States of America never surrendered nor have we, therefore the war continues!”

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General Ulysses S. Grant was asked by President Abraham Lincoln to stay on as Chief of Staff, but he declined and retired from military service, returning to Point Pleasant Ohio, the city of his birth.  He had become disillusioned by a questionable victory gone sour and the reemergence of an enemy he believed conquered forever.  Never the less the General decided that after all he would have done precisely what the Confederates were doing, had the war gone the other way.  He held no bitterness toward his former enemy, but decided that for him, war and politics were over.  He would however go on to play a key roll in rebuilding the railroads within the States and territory of the Confederacy, even to the extent of helping to construct the Confederate Continental Railroad, stretching from Atlantic to Pacific.
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The story of the Invisible Warriors spread throughout the countryside and indeed the entire Southland, faster then it could be published in the newspaper.  In any case the newspaper version of the most stories was sanitized for Yankee consumption, while an underground newsletter was circulated calling itself “The Confederate Informer.”  The Confederate Informer told the real news and found an eager cliental as each copy was read and passed along to others, thereby minimizing the cost as well as the burden of circulation.  President Lincoln somehow obtained a copy of the Confederate Informer read of the attacks being made against Union Force.  He spent a good while pacing back and forth in his office, mulling over in his mind as to what course of action would solve this dilemma.
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The President called Major General Henry W. Halleck who remained on duty as the Chief of Staff, into his office; the General taped on the door and was invited to enter.  General Halleck, the president stated, was I misinformed or has the war come to an end; did the Rebels not surrender or have we been perpetuating a myth as if it were reality?   Mr. President, we won the war all right and it is over, these Invisible Warriors is another issue entirely and regretfully, they have earned the title of ‘Invisible Warriors.’  They appear and disappear at will and our best efforts to track them down finds our troops chasing a ghostly shadow through the woods, only to find them disappearing before their eyes.  These Confederates have devised an entirely unique strategy and for them it works, to our loss!
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It is scarcely ten months after General Lee’s surrender at Appomattox and nearly every one of our top Generals who made the victory possible is either dead or in hiding, I am reluctant to call that a victory General Halleck.  What have you to offer whereby we might bring these attacks to an abrupt conclusion?  Well, said the General, according to the message relayed to us by the Commander of the Invisible Warriors, our options are to withdraw Federal Troops or they are dead men.  They have thus far made good on that statement; my best guess is that they obviously have develop an effective spy network.  We can only guessing as to how many of them there are, but they seem to attack in squads of seven.  The man they still look to as their Commander in Chief remains is in confinement and we have doubled the guard surrounding him.  My suggestion is to create a counter spy network of our own; people who can mingle with these Southerners!
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That General is the best suggestion I’ve heard to date, get started on the project and let me know if special funding is required.  Edwin M. Stanton, Secretary of War tapped on the door at that very moment and entered the room.  My apologies for being late Mr. President, but protesters and pickets delayed me; who by the way are calling for us to let the Southern States depart in peace.  Their signs indicate they are tired of the fighting; they want it to come to an end, now.  I will resist surrendering our hard won victory, as long as there is even a remote chance of holding this Union together, with or without pickets, stated the president.  I will attempt every viable option in the meantime!  What then is our next move, asked Secretary Stanton?  General Halleck will fill you in on the strategy, between the two of you, I want this plan put into action, and soon.
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Time passed, the attacks continued with little change; largely because General Halleck was more correct then he knew; the Invisible Warriors were aware of their strategy of spies and infiltration before the ink was even dry on the orders.  It was the spring of 1866, regardless of all the efforts made by the Yankees, President Jefferson Davis mysteriously disappeared from Federal Custody and into the underground world of the Confederate Invisible Warriors, and at the same time his wife Varina Banks Howell Davis was reported to have moved to the British Virgin Islands.   An anonymous message was delivered to the press, which was published throughout the South; “The Confederate States Constitution has never been rescinded nor has the Confederate States of America surrendered, therefore they remain.
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Our President continues to be Jefferson Davis, pending the independence of the Confederacy and followed by free elections according to our own constitution.  The power to disband a sovereign nation and terminate its constitution has never been granted to a hostile foreign power, its President or its Generals.”  The whereabouts of Jefferson Davis was unknown as was the precise location of his wife, the First Lady of the Confederacy; in any case the British refused the United States permission to search for her on the sovereign British territory of the Virgin Islands.  Federal Officials did manage to uncover sound reason to believe the Confederacy was amassing an enormous fortune somewhere off shore, thanks to sympathizers who had oppose the tyrannical tactics used by the Yankees during and after the war.
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Additionally raids made against Union gold stockpiles were causing serious problems for the federals, not-with-standing these Invisible Warriors knew all to well that the strength of a nation ultimately rested in the value of its currency.  Also there was the question of the missing Confederate Gold, which somehow disappears after the evacuation of Richmond on 2 April 1865; its location was no longer in doubt, at least on the part of the Invisible Warriors.  The seemingly endless miles of unguarded coastline surrounding the Confederate States had worked against the Confederacy during the war years, but now those same unguarded boarders allowed for the smuggling of men, material, weapons, ammunitions and other items directly under the noses of the Yankees.
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General Robert E. Lee had come to regret the surrender of his army, due to what the Yankees had made of their victory, but remained out of the limelight, relinquishing his roll strictly to that of a College Professor.  However when he heard that President Davis had been rescued from federal custody and was now in command of these so called Invisible Warriors, he decided it was time to come out of retirement, in a manner of speaking.  His questionable health forbad him from taking an active military roll, he did however manage to make contact with the Confederate President and offer to serve as a coordinator of both military and aspects civilian aspects of the struggle.  Particularly since the Confederate Forces now confronting the Yankees were not always of a military in nature.
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Thus General Lee’s responsibilities were in many ways broader and more complex, but he served in the critical roll in bringing together the sympathetic foreigners, industrialists, bankers and a variety of other essential elements.  However he did manage to call upon his old warhorse General James Longstreet, asking him to return to actively serving the Confederate Cause.  This Longstreet did very effectively, by commanding a vast network of Invisible Warrior units across Virginia, North and South Carolina and Georgia.  In occupied Tennessee, Alabama and Mississippi, General Nathan Bedford Forrest run rap shod over the Yankee Armies, while they in turn had absolutely no idea whatsoever as to who was behind the wave of attacks lodged against them.
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The northerners, who had reelected Abraham Lincoln thinking victory would be a certainty, now questioned the wisdom of their own judgment.  There were other Confederate War Commanders, which suddenly began to disappear from the face of the earth; among them were Generals Richard S. Ewell, John C. Pemberton, Joseph E. Johnston and Colonel John Singleton Mosby.  In Kentucky General John Hunt Morgan who was believed dead, proved that he was very much alive.  These Confederate Leaders were all believed to be taking their orders directly from their newly freed Commander in Chief, Jefferson Davis.  Whether truth of fiction sightings of the Confederate Invisible Warriors was being reported from all over the now occupied Confederate States of America.
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General John C. Pemberton believing he had failed the Confederacy 1863 at Vicksburg, saw this as an opportunity to vindicate his honor while serving the cause he love so much.  He coordinated his actions with General Nathan Bedford Forrest and together they struck fear into the hearts of the Yankee occupation forces.  While at the same time each man appeared to be going about the business of adjusting to civilian life after surrender.  General Pemberton’s confrontation as a member of the Invisible Warriors came on the road from Jackson to Vicksburg, when his troops attacked and destroyed relief forces on the way to Vicksburg.  He then moved to eliminate the scalawag hold on Vicksburg by attacking them at their weakest point, while celebrating.
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It did not require much convincing to get General John Hunt Morgan to return to active Confederate Service and no one was better suited for covert operation then the very man who could outwit the Yankee Army at every turn.  Few people exhibited the art of infiltration as did John Hunt Morgan, as a member of the Confederate Invisible Warriors, he managed to attended scalawag meetings in order to uncover their Yankee connections, even managing to drop in on Union Army Staff meeting held at Fort Donnellson disguised as one of their own. Afterward many of these same scalawags and Union occupation officers manage to have terrible accidents.  He even posed as a traveling merchant selling his wares from a wagon, which was not at all common.
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Since these seven men could not possibly be everywhere at once, it was surmised that a number of individual bands had been formed in diverse places; their numbers would continue to grow as additional Commanders reported and reaffirmed their loyalty to their noble Confederate Cause.   By the summer of 1866 the Union Army which occupying the ‘Southern States’ found they could no longer safely patrol outside of a confined area within the cities and even then, only in large numbers during day light hours.  The next series of attacked came against the scalawag State Governments, inasmuch as whites, which had supported the Confederacy, was rendered ineligible to vote.  This meant that 80 percent of the population had been denied their unalienable rights to choose who shall represent them!
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This was made manifest when a large number of scalawags in Columbia South Carolina were meeting on a most pleasant evening to celebrate their good fortunes, upon departing the festivities there was much laughter and boasting among their numbers.  It was early evening but exceedingly black outside with no visible moon to light up the darkness; none of these men made it home and there was no evidence as to the perpetrators.  On one occasion a squad of Yankees was approaching a plantation in the countryside southeast of Atlanta Georgia when they were attacked and killed.  A large contingent of Blue bellies ransacked every home in the area and found no weapons or ammunition.  The Lieutenant in Charge of the Blue bellies himself met with a horrible accident, as did their Colonel in Command!
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The election of 1866 found the people turning against Abraham Lincoln and his tyrannical Republicans; the Republicans lost their majority in both Houses of the U.S. Congress by substantial numbers.  The Southern Electorate, which consisted of fewer then 20 percent of the voters had been frightened away from the poles and the disenfranchised majority held their own elections for State Government.  Once the Democrats {Democrats were conservative and sympathetic to the South at that time} were sworn into office during the spring of 1867 and the political dynamics shifted in favor of Confederate States Independence.  Now Lincoln was considered a weak, lame duck President holding only minimal power to govern!
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President Lincoln lacked sufficient votes at that time to pass any new legislation; legislation he considered as essential to reconstruction within the Southern States, additionally he was faced with a hostile congress, threatening his impeachment if he refused to withdraw the Union Armies from the South.  Laws were passed which had the effect of cutting off funding for those troops occupying the Southland; the federal congress held the votes to override a Presidents veto.  On 2 June 1867 Jefferson Davis was informed that Lincoln had issued the long awaited order and federal troops were even now, on the march northward; the Confederate President was joyful for the first time in a very long time.  However it took another six weeks before word finally reached the east, that the last of the federal troops had departed the member States and territories of the Confederacy.
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The message was delivered on 15 July at the headquarters of the Confederate Invisible Warriors, where Jefferson Davis was in hiding, that the last regiment of Yankee Troops had crossed the Colorado River, leaving behind the expanded territory of Arizona.  Oklahoma was already clear of the Blue bellies and was now occupied by regiments of the vastly expanded Invisible Warriors.   Jefferson Davis was now confident that it was time to make his presence known to his people and thus departed his Shenandoah Mountain hideout in route to the Confederate Capital City.  A call was sent out for those who previously held seats in the Confederate States Government to reassemble in Richmond; that since elections were not possible during occupation, these individuals continued in office.
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On 10 August 1867 Jefferson Davis reentered the city he had fled when approaching federal forces made it impossible for the Confederate States Government to continue in that location.  A full division of Confederate Troops escorted him into town, all uniformed in their newly reconstituted uniform and armed with the most up to date repeating rifles, pistols and other artillery.  He exited his coach and climbed about half way up the steps of the Capital Building, paused, then addressed the massive crowd gathered before him.  Jefferson Davis who was not accustomed to showing his emotions in public, so he look over to his wife Varina Davis standing by his side, having only recently returned from the Virgin Islands.  He had requested General Robert E. Lee’s presence, offering to restore him to command of the Confederate Armies.  Lee had agreed on the proviso that his appointment would be temporary due to his health and age, pending the confirmation of another suitable officer.
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While at the same time the British and French had pledged military intervention if the Lincoln Administration threaten to renew hostilities against the Confederacy, it would not prove necessary; both the British and French immediately granted recognition to the Confederate States of America and sent ambassadors for to present their paper to President Davis.  What massive armies assemble on the field of battle could not achieve, was ultimately accomplished by a covert force known as the Confederate Invisible Warriors.  In addressing the crowd that day upon his return, he expressed his gratitude to the Almighty God who had blessed their cause and the used the occasion to officially proclaim the independence of the Confederate States of America.  The Confederate States Congress had achieved a plurality, which was necessary for opening a new secession of the Congress.
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All but one of the former Davis Cabinet Secretaries returned to their offices, included among their numbers was Secretary of War John C. Breckinridge.  John C. Breckinridge was not only the last Secretary of War but also served as a Confederate General and fought at the Battle of Shiloh.  The Vice President of the Confederacy Alexander Stephens returned from Washington in time to stand with Jefferson Davis, as had been requested of him.  A large percentage of the War Veterans had also returned to service over the past couple years, in order to renew their collective struggle for the cause, but this time in largely covert ways, some as spies, others as active members of the Invisible Warriors.
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The Confederate Veterans now filled the streets with their numbers, most of them wearing their Gray Uniforms, left over from the war and waving their tattered banners; there were also those who had to be carried to the site due, to their injuries in battle.  But the highlight of the day was the pass and review of a couple divisions of what had been known as the Invisible Warriors; their Commander General George E. Pickett as well as the well known Colonel John Singleton Mosby now General Mosby leading the way.  As these troops marched past the location where President Davis stood, they gave a salute to their Commander in Chief.   The Confederate Private who had turned the tide by leaving the encampment at Appomattox Courthouse and refusing to surrender, was not only presented to the crowd, but also given an audience with President Davis the next day at a luncheon, where upon he answered to the name Douglas Bremerton of Tennessee.
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Varina Davis, the Confederate First Lady was invited to step forward and address the crowd; upon doing so she received a thunderous applause, which continued for some time before subsiding.  The praise heaped upon her was in behalf of her undying support, not only for her honored husband but also in behalf of the Confederacy itself.  She had been central in seeking support from business as well as foreign nations, greeting of foreign dignitaries and maintaining the monies, which formed the growing and urgently needed finances for the on going Confederate Cause.  She even served to rally the necessary leadership by which a plausible Confederate States Navy was organized, which included contracts for shipbuilding.
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Admiral Raphael Semmes followed up the appearance of the First Lady of the Confederacy, and formally transferred command of the newly recreated and now formidable Confederate States Navy to their rightful Commander in Chief, Jefferson Davis.  The Confederate Fleet consisted of a number of confiscated and updated former U.S. War Ships as well as a number of ships either donated or built for the Confederacy by foreign powers.  Included in this transfer was the Board of Admirals, which had served under Raphael Semmes and helped him to quietly and covertly recruit as well as train the necessary crews in order to man these ships.  The next day these ships as well as the Naval Officer Corps would be formally commissioned into the service of the Confederate States of America.
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The Confederate States of America at last took its place among the nations of the earth but in doing so, it adopted the phrase; “never again’ as its motto for preparedness.  Many Confederate Citizens, which had fled the Confederacy, began to return and the subject of reparations became a hot political topic in the following years.  Abraham Lincoln did not seek a third term and move to Canada having ended his presidency under bitter terms; he would later return in his old age to live out the remainder of his life in seclusion.  General Richard Ewell was nominated and confirmed as the Confederate Secretary of War!  Union General George McClellan was overwhelmingly elected President of the United States in 1868 and signed the formal peace and trade accords with Confederate President Robert E. Lee, whom he had opposed so vehemently on the field of battle.
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Private Bremerton, who had begun it all, had been visiting kinfolks in Virginia when Fort Sumter was fired upon, so he joined the army of General Thomas J. ‘Stonewall’ Jackson.  The Presidents last remaining statement of the occasion was that “we have fought long and hard for our liberty as well as our independence, however now is the time to build the nation for which we have struggled.  To this task we call upon those of you who once born arms in her service, that you will now bear the tools, both literal and figuratively, which are required to forge the Confederate States of America.”  Nationwide elections were held in November in order to properly fill those seats since abandoned by scalawags, who had fled to the north; Robert E. Lee was elected President, but would die in office two years later.
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After the festivities were over, President Jefferson Davis returned to the Confederate Whitehouse in Richmond, where he had lived for more then half of the war years.  He sat in the study with his wife Varina where so much history had been made; his mind drifted back upon the many councils of war, which had taken place here.  The thought occurred to him, that someone had to record the history of the times!  After the two of them spoke on the subject over tea, it was agreed they’d seek the help of the Veterans as well as the ladies, asking them to begin to write.  The President asks that they not only record the history of the war itself, as they experienced it, but also of the atrocities committed against our people.  He himself began to take notes for what would become his famous works known as the ‘Rise of the Confederate States Government.’'
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God save the Confederacy
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“You may be whatever you resolve to be!”
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"Governor, if I had foreseen the use these people desired to make of their victory, there would have been no surrender at Appomattox, no, sir, not by me. Had I seen these results of subjugation, I would have preferred to die at Appomattox with my brave men, my sword in this right hand." --- General Robert E. Lee - as told to Texas ex-Governor F. W. Stockdale
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